Tag Archive | Tree Change

Goodman House Historic Precinct Daylesford

Set at the foot of the Daylesford Botanic Gardens, with premium views across a town loved for its distinct European flavour, Goodman House offers its inhabitants stylish, private living.

Goodman House, named after Archie Goodman, the town Mayor who lived and entertained Melbourne luminaries here during the 1950’s, was built in nearby Hepburn Springs in 1890 and moved to Daylesford, in one piece in 1910. It had barely been touched before the current owner undertook to breathe new life into the old home. A 70 year old Japanese maple in the back yard inspired the addition of the spectacular steel-framed conservatory with a splendid finial left over from the restoration of the 1880 Royal Exhibition Building.  A striking feature of the conservatory is the Turkish tiled wall, paying homage to the interior design of Ottoman imperial harems of the 16th and 17th centuries.

Goodman house is positioned in Camp Street, within walking distance of the shopping centre, fine dining establishments such as Mercato and Kazuki, the old Convent, Wombat Hill Botanical Gardens and the Hospital. Yet once you are inside the house it is like being enfolded in a cocoon. The outside world becomes oblivious. The choice is yours! You can choose to engage or close the front door and live in complete privacy.

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Historic Taradale Home

Long did I build you, oh house!
With each memory I carried stones
From the bank to your topmost wall
And I saw your roof mellowed by time

Taradale is a small town in Victoria, Australia. It is located on the Calder Highway between Melbourne and Bendigo. Its local government area is the Shire of Mount Alexander. At the 2011 census, Taradale had a population of 464. This historic home at 26 Faraday Street Taradale sits on pristine acreage overlooking the hamlet.

Rose Villa (Click this link to view web feature) was named by Florence Hookey, who, newly wedded to Frederick Hookey bought the home in 1902. The home was originally owned and built by William Graham in the 1860’s. Graham was the last Mayor of the Borough of Taradale in 1870 and sat on the bench of the court. He established a butchers business in Taradale.

Legend has it that Frederick Hookey’s father John swapped a block of land next to St Patrick’s Cathedral in Melbourne for a bullock team and headed to the gold fields. He never got much further than Malmsbury before realising that there was more money to be made supplying the miners with food.

Three generations of the Hookey family have resided in this home since then so it is no exaggeration to say that this is a rare opportunity to secure this beautiful historic property.

Designing a Nursery

Nursery Planning

Planning to decorate your baby’s nursery but not sure where to start? Here’s our top 10 tips to guide and inspire you.

1. Consider the room’s location and other practicalities If you have a choice, choose a quiet room close to your bedroom so you don’t have to walk far at night. Make sure that a cold room has adequate heating and a warm room has good ventilation. If the windows let a lot of light in, it may help your baby to sleep at night if you put black-out blinds or curtain linings up to keep the room dark.

2. Incorporate the style of your house into the nursery décor Is your interiors style traditional, contemporary or perhaps an eclectic mix? It’s important that your nursery design reflects your own personal style and how you’ve decorated the rest of your home. Otherwise, it will look out of place and you’ll tire of it very quickly.

3. Create your own mood board Search the internet and magazines for pictures you love and piece them together to create a mood board. This will help you to pick your colours, keep your ideas focused and pull your theme together.

4. Keep it simple With all the gorgeous nursery furniture and accessories available, it’s easy to over-decorate. Keep it simple and decide on a single focus for the room early on, such as a piece of furniture or artwork. Think child-friendly, not childish. Choose a neutral background and mix in age-appropriate accessories and you’ll reduce the need to redecorate every few years.

5. Choose soft, tranquil colours Consider using colours that are calming and nurturing. When your baby gets older she will tell you what she wants, so take this special time to consider what makes you feel relaxed. With the demands of a newborn, most mums need calm more than anything.

6. Choose adaptable décor Consider how long the nursery décor will last your baby. Wall paper with characters might have to be changed in a few years if your child finds it babyish or out-of-date. Wall stickers are a cheap, easy alternative for decorating that can be removed when your child gets older.

7. Think about safety If you are buying a new cot it should conform to AS/NZS 2172, as all new cots on sale in Australia and New Zealand have to meet this standard. This standard ensures that the cot is deep enough to be safe for your baby, that the bars are the correct distance apart, and that the cot does not have cut-outs or steps. Create a safe zone around the cot by positioning it away from windows, heaters, lamps, wall decorations and cords. Keep furniture that your baby could clamber on to away from the cot too.

8. Select key pieces first Select your furniture pieces before you start decorating. Parents often choose their colours first, but it’s actually easier and cheaper to match paints, fabrics and wallpaper to your key furniture pieces.

9. Strike a balance between form and function The hard part of designing your nursery is making sure it’s practical and easy to use. Consider what the room needs to be used for, the size of the room and how long it will be a nursery. This will help you design the space to fit your needs.

10. Think outside the box Just because furniture and accessories are not nursery-specific doesn’t mean that you can’t use them. The same can be said for wallpaper, fabric, and wall stickers. Choose items and colours that you love.

Gracious Mud Brick Home on Acreage

Yapeen

As you turn into this property and follow the sweeping drive, past the field where sheep or horses can graze, you cannot help but be taken by the natural beauty of this Yapeen setting.

547_Mford-Yapeen_09L

This gracious mud brick home on the Yapeen Muckleford Road, Yapeen, offers not only a rural family lifestyle but the possibility of renting the completely separate, self contained, two bedroom cottage. Indeed, there are a number of options for making use of the accommodation that is available here.

Bushland Home

Ranters1

One of the striking features of this property at 176 Ranters Gully Road, Muckleford, is the pristine bush setting and the stunning views of Mount Franklin. As the owners of this 10 acre property will tell you, it is the bush, the sense of sanctuary and the privacy which is what they have loved most about living here.

Given that there are three dwellings within relative proximity of one another it is all the more amazing that each seems to have a bio system of its own and that they do not impinge in any way upon the other. As a result it is possible to rent two and live in one and still enjoy all the sense of solitude that this property offers.

Another feature is the sense of contrast in the styles of living provided. The main home offers a divine, retro world while the light airy, two bedroom barn will suit those who like the modern, ‘industrial’ feel. In contrast the compact, snug Studio is an ideal place to escape completely.

Sanctuary Beckons

llewelynsMake sure to take the time to check out this newly listed property in Green Gully, Newstead.

As soon as you turn into this No Though Lane  in Green Gully you have entered 47 Llewellyns Lane. The lane winds and curves through bushland, leading to a very private, quiet part of the world.

Llewelyns Lane lies in a very central part of the Mount Alexander Shire. From here you can enjoy all the benefits of bush and pastoral living, yet still be in close proximity to neighbouring Newstead, Maldon and Castlemaine. Green Gully is little over an hour and a half from Melbourne, within less than an hour from Bendigo and only twenty five minutes from regional Maryborough.