Tag Archive | Maldon Real Estate

We Sell

We Sell

We are justifiably proud of our sales record! Midexpress_Sold-Property- Ad- September-2016 (Click to download our sales brochure)

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Deep Vein of Local Knowledge

The owner of this property in High Street Maldon had a very positive experience when she worked with Leah Panos. Leah tapped into a significant client base  and sold this property within three weeks.

The owner was delighted with Leah’s professional approach throughout the process. She noted that Leah’s outstanding communication skills, her depth of local knowledge and her capacity to match clients with properties made all the difference. She was particularly impressed that not only was Leah able to meet her individual needs throughout the marketing process but she was also able to balance and manage the specific needs of potential buyers.

wallerrealty.comAt the end of the day it is an agent’s personal touch, communication skills, intimate knowledge of the market, depth and range of experience which eases the stress of selling a home. Leah’s professionalism and local knowledge effectively removes stress and smoothes the process

If you are after a professional, personable approach towards the sale of your property please don’t hesitate to contact Leah and see the difference she can make for you.

 

 

Partnering Seals the Deals

Newstead

Set in a quiet residential setting with semi-rural outlook this brand new home in Newstead had great appeal and, like another property the owner had built in Maldon, sold quickly. Given that the Newstead market is a little bit tougher than Maldon the owner was delighted with this result. He feels that the property sold quickly because he had sought and acted upon the advice and insights provided by Leah Panos during the building process. He described the relationship of agent and owner as a ‘partnering’ and team approach.

wallerrealty.comGiven the success of this partnership it is little wonder that this owner will go on working with Leah! He found her to be pragmatic, willing to do pre-work prior to the sale of the property, an outstanding communicator, insightful about fittings that clients respond to and an ‘amazing’ source of local knowledge.

If you are interested in selling in this region and you want a true specialist who understands price points, what the market is responding to and who is willing to advise you throughout the process ring Leah Panos at Waller Realty. Talk to her clients and they will tell you that the service she provides is nothing short of ‘brilliant’!

 

Sold Within a Month

Baringyup

This property in the delightful rural hamlet of Baringhup was on the market with a Maryborough agent for almost nine months. It takes little to imagine how delighted the owners were when they put the property with Waller Realty and Leah Panos had sold it within a month, for more than the asking price.

wallerrealty.comDuring the nine months with the Maryborough agency there were two open for inspections and no one came to either. By contrast, once Wallers took over they not only advertised online but placed advertisements in the local paper. Within a month Leah had three parties who were interested. One party pulled out leaving the other two pushing each other over the line.

The owners particularly appreciated the professional, hard working approach that Leah adopted and would have no hesitation recommending that people who are serious about selling work with her.

Seachangers and treechangers! Do they ever come back?

Jules Bondy and Meghan Anders (and dog Lottie) are putting their Northcote home on the market and making the move to the country.

I want to live in a place that’s beautiful!” you cry. “There’s too much traffic, gentrification and too many people. I deserve more than grey concrete and my dog deserves more than a postage-stamp piece of grass masquerading as a park!”

So you pop your city home on the market, and move to where the grass is, apparently, greener. If you’re lucky, there’s a bit of ocean blue, too.

Your friends and neighbours promise to visit, and you visualise your new dining room filled with your (no longer) nearest but still dearest, all drinking wine made from grapes that ripened just five kilometres away, and eating free-range ham, goats cheese and olives all sourced from your new neighbours.

But is it time to wake up and smell the (city) coffee? Just how successful is a sea change, or tree change?

“Once you move out of town you never go back!” says public relations manager Tara Bishop. She says this despite it taking four years to “defrost” her local Bottle O shopkeeper on the Mornington Peninsula and actually get a smile back.

She moved from the CBD to near Rye and loves it. But does she know anyone who’s given up and gone back? “No. They all love it. They’re happier, their kids are happier,” she says.

A place in the country, such as this Castlemaine home, has always had its appeal for many people.

Sam Rigopoulos, director of Jellis Craig in Northcote and Rob Waller, director of Waller Reality in Castlemaine, may both lay claim to coining the term “North Northcote” for regional Castlemaine, but they agree on one thing; those who move from the city to the country don’t come back. They are, according to both agents, happy.

“The only ones that really stick in my mind that didn’t work out were when relationships broke up,” says Waller. “And maybe the odd few where they had to move to climb the ladder at work.”

In fact, Waller sees treechangers acting like magnets. “If you look at couples we sold to, you’ll see that two years later you sold to their brother and sister, and then mum and dad will make an appearance, too.”

We tracked down Helen Bodycomb, who, in 2009, told The Age she and her husband were joining the exodus from Northcote to Castlemaine. Update: they held onto their Northcote property until two years ago, realising they would never go back. “We initially thought we’d be here for a year,” she says now. “I was more keen coming here, but after two weeks, my husband said he didn’t want to leave.”

Still, if things do go awry, buying back into the city isn’t so straightforward, and Waller has seen treechangers get stung. “Years ago they’d sell the house in the city and buy something here, travel the world and buy a new car. Then maybe something would happen health-wise, or they’d want to come back to be near the grandkids, and they’d find they couldn’t come back to where they’d come from,” he says.

Waller says people are being smarter with their money. “Now, if they sell a four-bedroom house in Camberwell, they will buy a country property in Castlemaine and simultaneously buy a townhouse in Fairfield, Kew or Richmond,” he says.

Long-time Northcote residents Jules Bondy and Meghan Anders and their two children attempted to move to Castlemaine over a decade ago, but failed.

“I set it up so our Northcote house would be auctioned one hour before the house in Castlemaine,” Bondy remembers. But no one bought the Jessie Street property. There were no offers, so I couldn’t bid and it was sold at auction. That was bad,” he recalls. Ten years later, a now renovated Jessie Street is hitting the market.

“The draw to the north may have ebbed slightly but it never really left. We saw this gorgeous property, like a dream house, not in Castlemaine, but in Mount Macedon – it’s the new Castlemaine!” he jokes.

Bondy, a public servant, will continue working in Melbourne, and is expecting a 48-minute commute on the train to the CBD, while Anders, a primary school teacher, will look for work closer to her new home.

Anders is Melbourne born and bred, but has long dreamed of moving to the country. “Making the leap now has given us such a deep sense of being alive!” she says, though admits the hardest thing will be losing the proximity to friends and family, and the cinema.

Source: Domain article by Jayne D’Arcy

Opening up Small Areas

small patio design ideas 1You don’t have to renovate your home or add on rooms to make it bigger. Instead, there are plenty of ways to make small areas seem larger than they really are. This will come in handy when you’re ready to sell your home and want to impress buyers.

Here are some ideas for opening up small patios. Meanwhile! In the house you can

  • Hang mirrors. Having mirrors on opposite walls makes rooms appear more spacious. It’s also a good way to reflect more light into the room to make it brighter, which can also make it seem larger.
  • Paint. Painting the walls can make a room look more open when you stick to cool tones or white. Another paint tip is to have the crown molding painted the same color as the ceiling to make the room seem wider.
  • Put in bay windows. Having bay windows installed provides a room with a little more space and a lot more natural light. The added square footage and sunlight will give it a roomier feel.
  • Choose furniture wisely. Keep furniture in smaller rooms simple, so it won’t take up valuable space. Look for taller pieces when buying dressers, entertainment centers or shelving units. These can make your ceiling appear higher, which makes the room itself look larger.
  • Go with streamlined cabinets. Kitchen cabinets with simple lines make rooms look less cluttered than ones with ornate designs. You can make a kitchen look even larger by putting in stainless steel appliances, which provide reflective surfaces.

Opening up small areas in a home doesn’t require a big budget or tons of time. With these ideas, you can easily give your home a more spacious look.

Selling in Autumn

autumn_houseSpring is traditionally a busy period for the real estate industry – but did you know you’re actually more likely to sell your property in autumn?

It’s popular opinion that spring is the best time to sell your home, explains Luke Woollard, director of Pilot Estate Agents in Mornington, and for good reason.

“After the doldrums of winter, it’s believed that there are plenty of home buyers out there, which will result in lots of competition for your home,” he says.

The reality, however, is that spring doesn’t always bring with it a fresh supply of willing and eager homebuyers. continue reading 

More Tips

How to Sell a Home in Autumn
How to sell in Autumn

Innovative Point of Difference

At the door of the house who will come knocking?
An open door, we enter
A closed door, a den
The world pulse beats beyond my door
Pierre Albert Birot

Wimereux

According to the owner of Wimereux  this highly individual web feature  was an innovative and interesting way to showcase his home and extend the reach of advertising.

He felt that by providing this option Wallers provided “a very clever point of difference” to other real estate agents.

Take the time to check out some web featured properties and you will see, not only the potential, but how each treatment shows the insight and depth of understanding that Heather Blakey, the web designer, has of each property.

Tiny House Movement

Tiny House Movement

If you want to learn more click this very colourful Tiny House to view the Tiny House, Australia, Facebook.

Come across one of the many photos of the “tiny houses” circulating on blogsand Pinterest, and your first reaction will probably be how cute they are — itty, bitty, bite-size domiciles straight out of a fairy tale. Your second reaction, depending on who you are, is either: How do people fit in there? Or simply, why?

Welcome to the world of tiny housers, people whose choice of living space more or less forces them to embrace the simple life. Many of them live off-the-grid and are of the DIY mentality; they’ve built a community through blogging about their space-maximizing decorating strategies, renting out their homes as novelty hotels (the 165-square foot house pictured above is available on Airbnb) and getting together at tiny house conferences, all while attempting to legitimize their housing choice in the eyes of building codes drawn too narrowly to include their alternative lifestyle.

Emotionally Detaching When Selling

Putting the home you’ve lived in for years on the market isn’t an easy thing to do. When you’ve built up strong emotional connections to your home, having to get ready to part with it can be challenging.

Unfortunately, severing those emotional ties when selling your home is necessary. Otherwise, you could end up making it harder to find a buyer. Here are a few effective ways to become less emotional and more practical about selling:

  • Expect stress. When you admit that putting your home on the market is going to be tough for you, it can actually help you handle it better. By acknowledging the stress involved, instead of trying to ignore it, you’ll be better prepared to move forward with selling your home.
  • Confide in others. Your real estate agent will understand the emotional hardships involved with selling your home, and talking about your feelings will help you determine if you’re really ready to sell. If you have to sell due to your job or some other reason, share your concerns with family members and friends. Having emotional support will make the selling process easier for you.
  • Make your home less personal. Removing personal items, which you’ll need to do if you’re staging your home, will help you think of your house as a product to sell instead of your personal home. Taking your real estate agent’s suggestions on changes to make, such as repainting the walls, can also help you sever emotional ties when selling your home.

When you get into the mindset that your home is a product, you’ll have an easier time selling it and you’ll be more likely to list it at a fair price instead of one that’s too high.

Moving With Pets

moving-dog1. Gather Vet Records

If you are moving a considerable distance away from your current home, it is important to ask your current veterinarian for records that will be requested by the new vet office. These can usually be easily printed out of faxed over to the new medical-care provider, but the source says to always keep the former vet’s contact information on file, just in case of an emergency

2. Update Tags With New Address

It is also crucial to update your pet’s tags with proper identification including up-to-date contact information and your new home’s address. This will be helpful if something were to happen during the moving process. Including a cell phone number is best, as your new home phone may not be set up yet.

3. Manage Their Stress Exposure

Studies show that pets can easily be stressed out during moves, so The Pet Realty Network suggests keeping them secluded from chaos that can ensue on moving day. This means keeping them in a separate and familiar room or even asking a friend or family member to watch over them while multiple people are in the house and items are being moved around. If you’re keeping your pet in the house while movers are present, make sure they are in a room that has already been cleared out and post a do-not-disturb sign to keep those helping out.

4. Remember Pet Meds and Pets First Aid Kit

When preparing a first aid kit be sure to  leave medications and food outside of moving boxes, as they could be needed in case of an emergency. If your pet is on medications, be sure to get them filled before relocating. When preparing your first aid kit, be sure to include bandages, towels and hydrogen peroxide.

5. When Traveling Protect Your Pets

If you are transporting your pet to your new home by car, be sure to keep them in a crate, as allowing them to roam freely around your vehicle can be dangerous and unsafe for both of you. Pets can be a major distraction when behind the wheel and giving them their own space can also keep them calm. When flying, be sure that you and your pet meet all necessary airline requirements and purchase a proper crate for their travels. The source notes you should also consult your veterinarian before making flying arrangements, as not all pets are fit to do so.

6. Ask Your Current Vet For a Referral

Pet owners should ask their former veterinary clinic for a referral for their new location, while talking to other pet owners in your new community can be helpful. Selecting a new vet is important, so be sure they are convenient and that facilities are kept up. Asking for a tour and meeting the doctors, technicians and assistants can help you make the best decision possible.

More tips for moving with Pets

Home Staging Tips

Home staging ideasThe art of staging a home for sale not only takes time and dedication, it also takes experience and creativity. While moving a couch and organising the family room are a good place to start, homeowners really need to put in a little extra effort if they want to see a great result – including a higher priced offer and a faster sale!

To help get your clients moving in the right direction, here are some tips from professional stagers that are sure to impress potential buyers from the moment they set their eyes on the listing:

  • Start on the outside: Make a great first impression by cleaning up your lawn and garden, adding in some potted plants around the front steps/doorway, polishing the numbers on the house and updating the lighting fixtures and doorknobs.
  • Contain the clutter: Having extra clutter lying around can take away from the spacious feel of a home. Before the open house, find a new place for your car keys, shoes, coats and any other random accessories found in your foyer, cabinets and on counters. Barb Schwartz of the International Association of Home Staging Professionals says you should consider putting at least a “quarter of your furniture in storage, a third of your books in boxes and at least half of your knickknacks away.”
  • Use decorations to highlight, not hide: Re-arrange your furniture to highlight the unique details of your home, including fireplaces, crown-molding and beadboards. However, be careful to not block the flow of traffic – this could make the home feel much smaller and more confined than it really is.
  • Out with the old, in with the new: Paint is a great way to quickly update the look and feel of a room, but there is only so much a new coat can do if your furnishings are outdated. If you can’t afford a whole new set, trade pieces with a friend or relative, or place your existing furniture in storage and rent a more contemporary style for the time being.
  • Create a blank slate: Buyers need to imagine themselves in your home, and they can’t do so if they are surrounded with the personal items of its current inhabitants. Observe the following the rule of a furniture showroom: anything you wouldn’t expect to see on display in a showroom (including art, personal photos, makeup, blow-dryers, toothbrushes, etc), box it up and put it away!
  • Do an open for inspection dress rehearsal: Ask a few of your friends to come over to do an open house “dress rehearsal.” Ask them to give their honest opinion about improvements that you could make.
  • Last but not least, CLEAN: Your final step before the open house is to clean from top to bottom – including the windows (inside and out), behind the toilets, the tiles in the bathroom and under all the sinks. If you don’t have time to regularly do this deep of a cleaning, bring in a professional to tackle it for you while your home is on the market.

Summer Sales

SummerThere are an number of things to think about before selling your home. This is a time of big change so you’ll want to make the best of the situation to ensure you get the best result possible. If you’re looking to sell over the warmer months there are a couple of things you can do to make your property appeal to a summer buyer.

Maximising outdoor space

It’s easy to let the summer sun get in the way of going some routine gardening but making sure that your outdoor area looks its best is a sure way to capture a buyer’s attention. Your buyers will be looking for a space where they can enjoy the sun so sprucing up the exterior of your home and keeping a high level of kerb appeal will massively improve your chances of securing a sale. Water the grass and garden so it looks lush come inspection time and clean up any outdoor entertaining areas. A lick of paint on fences or a new coat of oil on your deck will freshen up the outside’s appearance.

Keep it cool

Scheduling inspections at the beginning of the day can have two benefits. First, buyers are more likely to venture out house hunting earlier in the morning when they have plenty of time rather than late in the afternoon when the day’s coming to an end. Second, an early inspection will avoid the heat of the afternoon sun. There is nothing worse than a stuffy home so keeping doors and windows open for ventilation or switching the air con on low will make the inside a pleasant place to be on a warm day. Little details like a vase of flowers or a scented candle can also make the indoors a nice place to be.

Summer clean

Forget spring – summer is the perfect time to thoroughly clean your home. If your kids are off school for the holidays get them involved in the clean up. Not only does decluttering add a bit of polish, it can help put you in the right frame of mind for a move.

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