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Historic Taradale Home

Long did I build you, oh house!
With each memory I carried stones
From the bank to your topmost wall
And I saw your roof mellowed by time

Taradale is a small town in Victoria, Australia. It is located on the Calder Highway between Melbourne and Bendigo. Its local government area is the Shire of Mount Alexander. At the 2011 census, Taradale had a population of 464. This historic home at 26 Faraday Street Taradale sits on pristine acreage overlooking the hamlet.

Rose Villa (Click this link to view web feature) was named by Florence Hookey, who, newly wedded to Frederick Hookey bought the home in 1902. The home was originally owned and built by William Graham in the 1860’s. Graham was the last Mayor of the Borough of Taradale in 1870 and sat on the bench of the court. He established a butchers business in Taradale.

Legend has it that Frederick Hookey’s father John swapped a block of land next to St Patrick’s Cathedral in Melbourne for a bullock team and headed to the gold fields. He never got much further than Malmsbury before realising that there was more money to be made supplying the miners with food.

Three generations of the Hookey family have resided in this home since then so it is no exaggeration to say that this is a rare opportunity to secure this beautiful historic property.

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Landmark Property in Burnett Road

At the door of the house who will come knocking?
An open door, we enter
A closed door, a den
The world pulse beats beyond my door
Pierre Albert Birot

Pine Hill Castlemaine

Probably named because of two Bunya Pines (Araucaria Bidwillii) and Hoop Pine (Araucaria Cunnighami), these with three Funeral Cypress and several Cabbage Tree Pine Hill is a gracious historic Castlemaine home. Built by Samuel Kelsall in 1862 Pine Hill lies on prize acreage at 9 Burnett Road, Castlemaine, just a hop, skip and a jump from Castlemaine’s Botanical Gardens.

Once you pass through the ornate gates, decorated with peacocks, walk slowly up the winding drive that leads to the period homestead.

Stop to feel the energy of this space and reflect upon the stylistic elements of this home. It features typical gables, an asymmetrical plan and a verandah with open-work supports.

The current owners have a file filled with information about the property, the period when it was included in a Australian Garden History itinerary, and the Yandell family who lived here in the late 1800’s.

A.C. Yandell was a native of the town, the son of a pioneer resident and leading public man. He was a consulting herbalist in Mostyn Street, a consistent advocate of Castlemaine and giver to all progressive movements of Castlemaine.

This is a simply designed, stylish home. Each room has retained original features and with them comes a sense of a bygone time. Make sure to check out the recent owners library, find out which were their summer and winter bedrooms and stop to enjoy the delightful ‘garden room’, the perfect place to have tea and read the paper.

Above all take the time to stroll and discover the not so hidden treasures amongst the magnificent, historic outbuildings.

A Very Castlemaine and Maldon Christmas

castlemaine christmas

Whether you’re looking for handmade gifts, someone to cook your Christmas lunch or a spot to share some carols with friends and family, our region has it all.

Shop local and handmade

The Castlemaine Artists Market showcases over 40 established and emerging local artists, designers and craftspeople. At this year’s annual Twilight Market on Friday 16 December they’ll be joined by the Castlemaine Farmers’ Market so you can shop for presents and produce from over 100 stalls. While you’re there enjoy some great food, cool tunes, a craft workshop or even a cocktail!

Light up the night

Each night, as the sun sets, we put on a show. Local homes and businesses are transformed by everything that twinkles, glitters and glows. Bundle the kids in the car and take a tour. You’ll find maps in the Castlemaine Mail and Tarrangower Times.

Carol under the stars

Gathering with friends and family and a picnic dinner for carols under about a billion stars is the stuff Christmas memories are made of round here.

You’ll find the Maldon Carols by Candlelight in the Shire Gardens on Saturday 17 December where you’ll hear the Maldon Brass Band and other local artists thanks to the Maldon Lions Club. Castlemaine Carols by Candlelight is the work of Rotary Castlemaine with musical theatre company Three’s A Crowd, the Thompson’s Foundry Band and plenty of other local talent in Victory Park on Wednesday 21 December.

Celebrate with food and music

Whether you’re after something kid friendly or a night out with friends we’ve got you covered.

Take someone special for a meal at the Public Inn, housed in Castlemaine’s Old Fire Station, before the Christmas rush. Sample a local craft beer or cider at The Taproom at The Mill, Castlemaine’s recently transformed historic woollen mill. Or grab some friends and celebrate the return of the Criterion Hotel Castlemaine’s famous Christmas Eve Party.

Want a year off cooking the Christmas lunch? Locals, The Bridge Hotel (who recently won Best Regional Venue at The Age Music Victoria Awards – congrats!) and The Five Flags Hotel Campbells Creek are both open with delicious set menus sure to make your day a happy one.

Be part of a country Christmas tradition

Thought Santa only travelled by sleigh? Think again. In Castlemaine and surrounding towns the man in red delivers lollies and icy poles to excited kids from the back of a ute on Christmas morning.

It’s a tradition that started nearly 80 years ago when the Castlemaine Apex Club would deliver food hampers to families in need. It continues today thanks to the dedication of the Castlemaine Past Apexians and it’s a special part of our Christmas morning that’s loved by everyone regardless of age.

Whatever you do this Christmas we hope it’s a safe and happy one for you and your loved ones, from everyone at Waller Realty.

Information that may help you decide to come to live here

There are many things that can help you make the decision to leave the city and come to a  regional centre like Castlemaine. Knowing that there is good child care and good quality schools may help you decide.

schools

daycare

With you for as long as it takes

The owners of this beautifully presented property in Racecourse Road Newstead chose to place their property with Waller because, by comparison with other agencies, Wallers had the most professional marketing process. They sought to work with Liz Bell because of her reputation, professional demeanour and familiarity with the Newstead area.

Liz BellThis home went onto the market during the heat of summer and, as with many properties in this region, it did take some time to find the right buyers. The owners particularly appreciated that throughout a particularly hot summer and the recent colder months Liz maintained a positive approach and maintained regular contact with them. They found Liz to be not only personable but to be an agent who followed through every lead and who, when it all seemed to go quiet, left no stone unturned.

Liz has built a reputation for not only being personable but for being a determined, hard working, effective negotiator. She will be supportive and work for as long as it takes. If you are seeking a professional, honest and fresh approach towards the sale of your property please don’t hesitate to contact Liz and see the difference he can make for you.

Sold Within a Month

Baringyup

This property in the delightful rural hamlet of Baringhup was on the market with a Maryborough agent for almost nine months. It takes little to imagine how delighted the owners were when they put the property with Waller Realty and Leah Panos had sold it within a month, for more than the asking price.

wallerrealty.comDuring the nine months with the Maryborough agency there were two open for inspections and no one came to either. By contrast, once Wallers took over they not only advertised online but placed advertisements in the local paper. Within a month Leah had three parties who were interested. One party pulled out leaving the other two pushing each other over the line.

The owners particularly appreciated the professional, hard working approach that Leah adopted and would have no hesitation recommending that people who are serious about selling work with her.

Seachangers and treechangers! Do they ever come back?

Jules Bondy and Meghan Anders (and dog Lottie) are putting their Northcote home on the market and making the move to the country.

I want to live in a place that’s beautiful!” you cry. “There’s too much traffic, gentrification and too many people. I deserve more than grey concrete and my dog deserves more than a postage-stamp piece of grass masquerading as a park!”

So you pop your city home on the market, and move to where the grass is, apparently, greener. If you’re lucky, there’s a bit of ocean blue, too.

Your friends and neighbours promise to visit, and you visualise your new dining room filled with your (no longer) nearest but still dearest, all drinking wine made from grapes that ripened just five kilometres away, and eating free-range ham, goats cheese and olives all sourced from your new neighbours.

But is it time to wake up and smell the (city) coffee? Just how successful is a sea change, or tree change?

“Once you move out of town you never go back!” says public relations manager Tara Bishop. She says this despite it taking four years to “defrost” her local Bottle O shopkeeper on the Mornington Peninsula and actually get a smile back.

She moved from the CBD to near Rye and loves it. But does she know anyone who’s given up and gone back? “No. They all love it. They’re happier, their kids are happier,” she says.

A place in the country, such as this Castlemaine home, has always had its appeal for many people.

Sam Rigopoulos, director of Jellis Craig in Northcote and Rob Waller, director of Waller Reality in Castlemaine, may both lay claim to coining the term “North Northcote” for regional Castlemaine, but they agree on one thing; those who move from the city to the country don’t come back. They are, according to both agents, happy.

“The only ones that really stick in my mind that didn’t work out were when relationships broke up,” says Waller. “And maybe the odd few where they had to move to climb the ladder at work.”

In fact, Waller sees treechangers acting like magnets. “If you look at couples we sold to, you’ll see that two years later you sold to their brother and sister, and then mum and dad will make an appearance, too.”

We tracked down Helen Bodycomb, who, in 2009, told The Age she and her husband were joining the exodus from Northcote to Castlemaine. Update: they held onto their Northcote property until two years ago, realising they would never go back. “We initially thought we’d be here for a year,” she says now. “I was more keen coming here, but after two weeks, my husband said he didn’t want to leave.”

Still, if things do go awry, buying back into the city isn’t so straightforward, and Waller has seen treechangers get stung. “Years ago they’d sell the house in the city and buy something here, travel the world and buy a new car. Then maybe something would happen health-wise, or they’d want to come back to be near the grandkids, and they’d find they couldn’t come back to where they’d come from,” he says.

Waller says people are being smarter with their money. “Now, if they sell a four-bedroom house in Camberwell, they will buy a country property in Castlemaine and simultaneously buy a townhouse in Fairfield, Kew or Richmond,” he says.

Long-time Northcote residents Jules Bondy and Meghan Anders and their two children attempted to move to Castlemaine over a decade ago, but failed.

“I set it up so our Northcote house would be auctioned one hour before the house in Castlemaine,” Bondy remembers. But no one bought the Jessie Street property. There were no offers, so I couldn’t bid and it was sold at auction. That was bad,” he recalls. Ten years later, a now renovated Jessie Street is hitting the market.

“The draw to the north may have ebbed slightly but it never really left. We saw this gorgeous property, like a dream house, not in Castlemaine, but in Mount Macedon – it’s the new Castlemaine!” he jokes.

Bondy, a public servant, will continue working in Melbourne, and is expecting a 48-minute commute on the train to the CBD, while Anders, a primary school teacher, will look for work closer to her new home.

Anders is Melbourne born and bred, but has long dreamed of moving to the country. “Making the leap now has given us such a deep sense of being alive!” she says, though admits the hardest thing will be losing the proximity to friends and family, and the cinema.

Source: Domain article by Jayne D’Arcy

Before You Invest in Holiday Homes

holiday-accommodation-mollymook-waterfront

Rental returns

Rental returns can and do fluctuate widely for holiday homes. In many coastal spots, the average holiday rental period is eight weeks a year with demand plummeting during winter.

Michael Troon, CEO of Lorne Real Estate, on Victoria’s Great Ocean Road where prices have doubled in the past five years, says investors who buy into places such as Lorne do so for capital growth rather than rental return.

Troon estimates that permanent rentals – where the property is leased all year round – account for less than 5 per cent of Lorne properties and typically provide a net annual yield of no more than 2 to 2.5 per cent. While holiday properties in the region typically command weekly rents of $2000 or more in peak periods, most lie vacant for the rest of the year and annual yields are similar to a permanent rental.

Demand is more consistent for holiday properties in warmer locations but only for prime properties. Karen Stephens, holiday letting agent at Raine and Horne at Terrigal on NSW’s Central Coast, says proximity to the beach and a sea view make all the difference when it comes to success with holiday letting. She says quality houses with these attributes can achieve an annual rental income of between $30,000 and $40,000 or even higher. However, for properties further back from the beach it’s a different story; their owners are often advised to consider a permanent tenant.

Tax implications

When you buy a holiday home and rent it out for any period, you must declare the income in your tax return. If you intend to use your property for part of the year and then operate it as an investment property for the rest of the time, you will need to convince the Tax Office that the property is a genuine investment. While you are able to claim deductions (including interest expenses) for any times that you have rented out the holiday home, these must be allocated according to the time it was rented out. Unless the holiday home is your main residence, you will most likely have to pay capital gains tax when you sell it or transfer it into someone else’s name.

Source of Article

Need to Move Quickly?

Moving HouseIf you’ve suddenly found out that you’ll have to sell your home in a hurry, don’t panic. While you won’t have time to do some serious renovating, there are still plenty of things you can do to make sure you’re home is prepared for buyers.

Use the following tips to get a home ready for sale in 30 days:

  • Start with the exterior. Curb appeal is everything when you’re selling your home. Make sure your front yard looks its best by getting rid of weeds, planting flowers and mowing the lawn. As for your house, give the exterior some fresh paint and new hardware. Pressure wash it as well to make it look as clean as possible.
  • Do small repairs. Fix broken tiles, replace screens with tears in them and take care of any other minor repairs that are needed. Check all of the lights in your home to make sure they work, and replace bulbs as needed. Do routine maintenance on your home as well, such as replacing HVAC filters.
  • Fix up your kitchen and bathrooms. Paint the cabinets, make sure your appliances are coordinated in terms of appearance and replace or refinish the countertops if they’re worn. Clean the grout between tiles in your kitchen and bathrooms, and consider replacing the sinks, toilets and other plumbing fixtures it they’re outdated.
  • Remove personal items and collectibles. Put these in boxes, and make your home appear as tidy and clutter-free as possible.
  • Focus on neutral colors. Paint and decorate interior rooms in neutral tones, such as beige, white or light gray, to make your home more inviting. Stay away from bold colors.

Garden Festival

programThis year’s Garden Festival opens on 1 November. Melbourne Cup Day is 4 November: mark Cup weekend and the following week in your diaries.

The theme is Gardens out of the Box and you will see garden boxes outside the Market Building and at the Railway Station.

Souvenir programs are available from the Castlemaine Market Building and can be found in may local shops.

This is an ideal time to combine visiting gardens with visiting some of our weekly Open For Inspections.

And if you are interested in gardening take a moment to check out a few of our Pinterest Boards. There is one for those who love all things Vintage and another more general board that includes lots of ideas for those who are addicted to gardening.

Good News First Time Home Buyers

Good news for First Home Buyers

Good news for First Home Buyers

Victorian first home buyers will receive a 50 per cent discount on stamp duty as of TODAY.

The state government says eligible home owners will save up to $15,535 in stamp duty on dwellings valued up to $600,000, and will save 26,000 Victorians a total of $200 million over the next year.

First home builders will also benefit with a $10,000 grant for newly constructed homes, which will apply along with the stamp duty cut.

Victorian Treasurer Michael O’Brien says the cut, which has been increased from 40 per cent, will have a number of benefits.

“This is a very important measure which will make home ownership more affordable for tens of thousands of Victorians,” he said.

“It will ensure that we see more young families moving into that first home.”

Mr O’Brien said it would also support jobs in the construction industry, which was one of the state’s biggest employers with about 250,000 people working in the sector.

 

Tiny House Movement

Tiny House Info-graphic

What are Tiny Houses? The Tiny House Movement? Tiny Living?

Simply put it is a social movement where people are downsizing the space that they live in. The movement began in America. The typical American home is around 2600 square feet, while the typical small or tiny house is around 100-400 square feet. Tiny Houses come in all shapes, sizes and forms but they focus on smaller spaces and simplified living.

People are joining this movement for many reasons, but the most popular reasons are because of environmental concerns, financial concerns and seeking more time and freedom.  For most Americans 1/3 to 1/2 of their income is dedicated to the roof over their heads; This translates to 15 years of working over your life time just to pay for it and because of it 76% of Americans are living paycheck to paycheck.

So what is the alternative?  One might be to live smaller.  While we don’t think tiny houses are for everyone, there are lessons to be learned and applied to escape the cycle of debt where almost 70% of Americans are trapped in right now.

The small house movement is gaining ground around the world with its vision of living simply and sustainably in small spaces. Here in Castlemaine there are a number being built.

Want to see more? Check our Pinterest page for ideas and begin here and learn more about Tiny Living.