Archives

Cycle the Goldfields

Image: Tread Harcourt

If you really want to experience our region there’s no better way than on a bike.

Cyclist of all ages and abilities are spoilt for choice with sensational bush bike trails, touring options and kilometres of exhilarating, scenic road riding. And now, with a world class mountain bike park in Harcourt scheduled for completion towards the end of 2017, we’re about to take it up a notch.

Backed by the Victorian Government, the Harcourt mountain bike park will provide up to 34 kilometres of trails for all abilities with stunning views in a natural forest setting. Built to International Mountain Bicycling Association standards the park is expected to attract 100,000 visitors each year.

It’s an exciting development for our region: great for tourism, great for jobs and yet another fantastic way to fill in your spare time if you’re lucky enough to live here.

But our region has long been a popular destination for cyclists.

Image: Tread Harcourt

The iconic Goldfields Track which stretches from Ballarat to Bendigo winds its way through the district and we’re only a short drive from Bendigo’s trail network. In March this year the upgraded Maldon to Castlemaine Rail Trail was officially opened, a leisurely, scenic 18 km trail running between the two towns alongside the heritage Victorian Goldfields Railway. You can even pit your speed and skills against the train at the annual Race the Train event each November.

We’re renowned for our single track riding, with loads of great, well promoted trails to find yourself, or you can talk to a local and get them to send you in the right direction.

One local who’s always happy to talk about cycling is Peter Grant, owner of The Bike Vault in Castlemaine. Peter grew up in the area and he and his brother and business partner Gary Grant will celebrate 10 years in business this year.

“I think what cyclists love is that we’re close to Melbourne so the cycling is accessible but because we’re out of the city it’s safer,” says Peter.

“The road riding is excellent. The roads are quiet and there’s anything from undulating loops around Castlemaine to longer rides out to Maldon, around Baringhup, to Harcourt via the reservoir at Golden Point. There are so many options.”

“The Maldon Rail Trail is a fairly easy ride so it’s good for all abilities and if you pick a day when the train is running you can ride one way and get a ride back on the train, which is great for families” he says.

“If you’re trying the Goldfields Track, I think the best part is between Mount Franklin and Vaughan Springs, it’s a really great flowing area that’s easily accessible.”

The Bike Vault has bikes available for hire and they’re offering readers of the Waller Realty blog a unique deal. Come to The Bike Vault and mention this article for 50% off the cost of hire. What a great way to experience the region!

If you’re coming to the area we even have our own bike friendly accommodation. Tread Harcourt offers unique cycling-centric accommodation close to everything. They can sort you out with maps of the local trails, take you on a tour, organise a shuttle and help you really make the most of your stay.

You could also check out: Castlemaine Cycling Club Castlemaine Rocky Riders

Advertisements

Seachangers and treechangers! Do they ever come back?

Jules Bondy and Meghan Anders (and dog Lottie) are putting their Northcote home on the market and making the move to the country.

I want to live in a place that’s beautiful!” you cry. “There’s too much traffic, gentrification and too many people. I deserve more than grey concrete and my dog deserves more than a postage-stamp piece of grass masquerading as a park!”

So you pop your city home on the market, and move to where the grass is, apparently, greener. If you’re lucky, there’s a bit of ocean blue, too.

Your friends and neighbours promise to visit, and you visualise your new dining room filled with your (no longer) nearest but still dearest, all drinking wine made from grapes that ripened just five kilometres away, and eating free-range ham, goats cheese and olives all sourced from your new neighbours.

But is it time to wake up and smell the (city) coffee? Just how successful is a sea change, or tree change?

“Once you move out of town you never go back!” says public relations manager Tara Bishop. She says this despite it taking four years to “defrost” her local Bottle O shopkeeper on the Mornington Peninsula and actually get a smile back.

She moved from the CBD to near Rye and loves it. But does she know anyone who’s given up and gone back? “No. They all love it. They’re happier, their kids are happier,” she says.

A place in the country, such as this Castlemaine home, has always had its appeal for many people.

Sam Rigopoulos, director of Jellis Craig in Northcote and Rob Waller, director of Waller Reality in Castlemaine, may both lay claim to coining the term “North Northcote” for regional Castlemaine, but they agree on one thing; those who move from the city to the country don’t come back. They are, according to both agents, happy.

“The only ones that really stick in my mind that didn’t work out were when relationships broke up,” says Waller. “And maybe the odd few where they had to move to climb the ladder at work.”

In fact, Waller sees treechangers acting like magnets. “If you look at couples we sold to, you’ll see that two years later you sold to their brother and sister, and then mum and dad will make an appearance, too.”

We tracked down Helen Bodycomb, who, in 2009, told The Age she and her husband were joining the exodus from Northcote to Castlemaine. Update: they held onto their Northcote property until two years ago, realising they would never go back. “We initially thought we’d be here for a year,” she says now. “I was more keen coming here, but after two weeks, my husband said he didn’t want to leave.”

Still, if things do go awry, buying back into the city isn’t so straightforward, and Waller has seen treechangers get stung. “Years ago they’d sell the house in the city and buy something here, travel the world and buy a new car. Then maybe something would happen health-wise, or they’d want to come back to be near the grandkids, and they’d find they couldn’t come back to where they’d come from,” he says.

Waller says people are being smarter with their money. “Now, if they sell a four-bedroom house in Camberwell, they will buy a country property in Castlemaine and simultaneously buy a townhouse in Fairfield, Kew or Richmond,” he says.

Long-time Northcote residents Jules Bondy and Meghan Anders and their two children attempted to move to Castlemaine over a decade ago, but failed.

“I set it up so our Northcote house would be auctioned one hour before the house in Castlemaine,” Bondy remembers. But no one bought the Jessie Street property. There were no offers, so I couldn’t bid and it was sold at auction. That was bad,” he recalls. Ten years later, a now renovated Jessie Street is hitting the market.

“The draw to the north may have ebbed slightly but it never really left. We saw this gorgeous property, like a dream house, not in Castlemaine, but in Mount Macedon – it’s the new Castlemaine!” he jokes.

Bondy, a public servant, will continue working in Melbourne, and is expecting a 48-minute commute on the train to the CBD, while Anders, a primary school teacher, will look for work closer to her new home.

Anders is Melbourne born and bred, but has long dreamed of moving to the country. “Making the leap now has given us such a deep sense of being alive!” she says, though admits the hardest thing will be losing the proximity to friends and family, and the cinema.

Source: Domain article by Jayne D’Arcy