A night under the stars in historic Maldon

Main Street Maldon will be transformed into an open air theatre and restaurant

Enjoy the magical atmosphere this weekend at Maldon’s highlight event of the year, the Maldon Twilight Dinner.

For one night only tables will line iconic Main Street Maldon, declared Australia’s first Notable Town by the National Trust in 1965, transforming the streetscape and creating an utterly unique visual spectacle.

Share fabulous food from local providers, wine from the region and enjoy wonderful entertainment from international duo Pavarotti and the Diva and the Beatles Show Band, Rubbersoul.

Now in its 13th year, the Maldon Twilight Dinner started as a way to showcase Maldon’s cafes and producers and was originally called Tastes of Gold. Now three times the size, the dinner draws crowds from the local community and interstate.

“This year we’re bringing back the idea of showcasing local producers by providing hampers as part of the ticket price,” says Pamela Jewson, Secretary Maldon Eat Drink Events Inc.

“They’ll be packed with local delicacies including baguettes from LeSel, Harcourt cherries, chocolates from the Maldon Lolly Shop, cheese from Goldfields Farmhouse Cheese, southern fried free range chicken, beef and salads from the Spotted Cow, Miss Pritchards Pantry and The Gold Exchange Café. ”

The Twilight Dinner is historically a sell-out event but spectator tickets are still available so you don’t have to miss out on the atmosphere and entertainment. Why not book a table and have dinner at one of the town’s many restaurants, pubs and cafes?

The Maldon Twilight Dinner is on this Saturday 13 January. For more information, event tickets, or, for something extra special, a ticket to get there in style on the Victorian Goldfields Railway, call 0417 150 709.

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Summer in the Goldfields: our top picks

We’re on holidays this week, spending time with friends and family and having a rest after a busy year. While we all like to travel we’re spoilt for choice when it comes to things to do over the summer right here at home.

Here are some of the ways we like to relax, cool off and have fun when we’re not busy selling houses!

On the water

Lake Cairn Curran is a great place to swim, fish, ski and sail. Image: Cairn Curran Sailing Club

Golden Point Reservoir is one of the most picturesque spots in the district (if you watched the ABC series Glitch you might just recognise this little beauty). Built in 1868 it’s a spot loved by locals for swimming, fishing, canoeing, walking, picnicking and just general lazing around and relaxing.

Turpins Falls is a little further from Castlemaine, a little trickier to access, but this deep pool with high rock wall sides is another favourite. It’s one of several waterfalls along the Campaspe River and when the falls are running there’s a great view from the lookout.

We’ve been enjoying summers on Lake Cairn Curran for generations. It’s home to the Cairn Curran Sailing Club and a super spot for water skiing, jet skiing, fishing (Golden Perch, Brown Trout, Murray Cod and Redfin) and swimming. On a balmy summer night there are few betters spots for fish and chips or a BBQ.

Like to spend your summer’s poolside? We have four Council-owned outdoor swimming pools located in Castlemaine, Harcourt, Maldon and Newstead and they’re open from December to March. Chewton also has a much-loved community-run pool open for the season.

Sharing great food and drinks

The newly re-opened Bridge Hotel in Castlemaine is a great place to spend a sunny afternoon. Image: The Bridge Hotel Castlemaine

Our many, award-winning wineries are great places to while away a summer afternoon, especially when visitors drop by. Sutton Grange, Harcourt Valley, Bress, Guildford, pick your favourite or make a weekend of it and see them all. Many also serve great food.

Summer picnics are popular, especially when there are kids around. We like to walk up Mount Alexander and enjoy a picnic with a view, settle under a tree in the Oak Forest at Harcourt or even just find a shady spot in the Botanical Gardens in Castlemaine or Maldon.

Speaking of food, there are a few new local places we’re all pretty keen to try while we have some down time. The new Ice Cream Social ice cream parlour in Castlemaine and the recently re-opened Bridge Hotel in Castlemaine and Red Hill Hotel in Chewton are high on the list.

Hopefully there’s a little inspiration here for you if you’re headed our way these holidays, but whatever you do and wherever you go we hope it’s happy, relaxing and safe. See you in 2018!

More car parks a great Christmas gift for commuters

If you’re considering a move to our region and think commuting back to the city for work will be a part of your tree change then you’d be happy to know the upgrade to the Castlemaine Railway Station has been completed in time for Christmas.

Part of the Victorian Government’s $20 million commitment to fund additional parking spaces at 16 stations on railway lines experiencing high growth in passenger numbers, Castlemaine now has 150 new commuter parking spaces, as well as new lighting, footpaths and security cameras.

The lure of a more relaxed country lifestyle continues to attract more people to our region and for many, a daily commute back to city is one of the trade-offs for a more relaxed and affordable way of life.

According to V/Line, more than 227,000 passenger trips were taken from Castlemaine in the 2016/17 financial year and the number of trips for the current financial year-to-date is already up five percent compared to the same period last year.

The Bendigo line remains among the top performers for punctuality and reliability on the V/Line network exceeding its reliability targets for the eighth consecutive month. And with 38 new weekly services, new trains added and now extra night coaches on the weekends, the travel options just keep getting better.

Regular commuter Marton Gross, who lives in Maldon and works in IT in Melbourne’s CBD says his 3 – 4 day a week commute fits easily into this life.

Marton carpools the 15 or so minutes between Maldon and Castlemaine with a group he’s met since moving here six years ago and says he’s found commuting a “really positive experience”.

“The service is reliable and comfortable and there are lots of options when it comes to choosing when to travel,” says Marton, who’s home for dinner with his family each night by 6.30 and says he’d never trade the joys of country living for city life again.

“You build the travel into your routine and it becomes part of it,” he says. “I’ve developed some really strong friendships with other commuters over the years and use the travel time to clear emails and tackle some work.”

“I think lots of people on the outskirts of Melbourne would have a similar daily travel time to me. The difference is they’re most likely stuck on a packed service without a seat. V/Line travel is totally different. The seats are big and comfortable and you always get one.”

There’s likely to be more good news for rail travellers in the next few months with detailed planning underway on the $91 million upgrade and improvement works on the Bendigo line as part of the Andrews Government’s Regional Rail Revival.

Visit www.vline.com.au to find out more.

 

 

Maldon Folk Festival hits town this long weekend

From its beginnings on a makeshift stage on the back of a truck at the football oval in 1974, the Maldon Folk Festival has grown into a four day event showcasing music, dance, workshops and other events across the National Trust Classified township. And it’s on again this long weekend.

“Once again, we have a great line-up and it’s looking to be another great festival,” says Maldon Folk Festival Director, Pam Lyons.

“Eric Bogle is back and we have Damien Leith, Mile Twelve (USA), The New Macedon Rangers (USA) and Rob Barrett (UK) all joining us for the first time.”

This year’s performers also include Celtic-rock sensation Claymore and gypsy dance band The Royal High Jinx, Penny Larkins and Carl Pannuzzo, The Good Girl Song Project, Rich Davies & The Low Road and many more.

“As well as our concerts, workshops and street performers we have a memorial concert for Danny Spooner, long time festival stalwart, who sadly passed away early this year,” says Pam.

While the early years might have consisted of sessions at the Kangaroo Hotel or around the campfire at the oval, with a Sunday concert at Butts Reserve at the foot of Mount Tarrangower, the present day Festival has spread out to venues across the town.

Butts Reserve remains the hub, with the Guinness Tent and Troubadour Wine Bar now popular features, but visit these days and you’ll find events in the local pubs, cafes, gardens and churches. The link with the football club continues with musical items and the Poet’s Brunch held in the clubrooms and at Maldon Primary School you’ll find the popular craft market and Children’s Circus on the Saturday.

Experience the legendary, festival atmosphere over four decades in the making this long weekend 3 – 6 November. Check out the full Maldon Folk Festival program here.

 Waller Realty is pleased to have been a sponsor of the Maldon Folk Festival for many years and to be able to continue our involvement in 2017.

Rental reforms continue to create debate

Housing affordability is a key focus at all levels of government. With one in four Victorians currently renting and pressure on the rental market likely to increase as property prices rise, the Victorian Government is reviewing the rules surrounding the rights and responsibilities of renters and landlords.

The Andrews Labor Government has announced significant reforms to the Residential Tenancies Act, which it says are designed to give renters greater powers and information.

The Real Estate Institute of Victoria (REIV) has been vocal in its objections to many of the reforms, suggesting they lack balance and could have negative effects, including reducing landlord’s security over their investment and driving rental prices up.

“We would stress to all our landlords and tenants that these reforms are still proposed changes,” says Director of Leasing at Waller Realty, Narelle Waller.

“Obviously there is a significant drive for reform but it’s about finding the right balance between the needs of both landlords and tenants,” she says.

“We are monitoring the situation and we’re in touch with the REIV. We’re also available to speak with landlords, tenants and anyone considering an investment property in the area if they have questions.”

A full list of the proposed reforms can be found at www.vic.gov.au/rentfair

If you are a landlord or a renter there’s an option on the site for you to provide feedback on your experience and what you think the impact of the proposed changes might be on you and your family.

The Waller Realty team is dedicated to providing landlords and tenants with the best advice and care.

“At the moment it’s business as usual,” says Narelle. “The REIV will be working with the opposition and cross benchers going forward and we will make sure we keep our landlords and tenants up to date on the situation as it develops.”

 

Spring is on the menu in Castlemaine

Shake off winter and celebrate the abundance of the season at some of Castlemaine’s best (and newest) eateries.

Theatre Royal Castlemaine

The longest operating theatre on the mainland, the Theatre Royal recently opened their new restaurant, Bistro Lola, to complement their existing Espresso Bar.

Head chef Sarah Curwen-Walker describes Spring food as fresh and colourful. “Everything is lighter, brighter and more fragrant.”

A Spring menu must is the pan fried gnocchi with fresh spring vegetables like broad beans, peas, asparagus and the spectacular romanesco cauliflower and served with fresh horseradish, mint, mascarpone and garnished with beautiful pink and purple pea blossoms.

Freshness is key at this time of year so Sarah suggests making the most of our wonderful farmers markets and buying ingredients straight from the source.

Visit this Spring for pizza and wine specials, new films and exciting live music. Follow them on Instagram @bistrolola @theatreroyalcastlemaine on Facebook @theatreroyalcastlemaine or call 03 5472 1196.

Bress Wine, Cider & Produce

Crafting fine wines, ciders and produce using biodynamic practices, Bress welcome Spring each year with the re-opening of the Bress Kitchen.

Founder and Head Wine and Cider Maker, Adam Marks, describes Spring food as fresh and life affirming.

Broad beans are a favourite ingredient. Delicious raw, lightly blanched or cooked in the pod and a perfect match for another Spring staple, the Bress Kitchen overnight wood fire roasted 2 tooth lamb shoulder, which is served on a bed of broad beans sautéed in the lamb jus.

“I love lamb and with all the fresh grass about Spring lamb, and particularly 2-tooth lamb, has great flavour,” says Adam.

Join Adam for lunch on the last weekend of each month from October, starting with their fabulous spit roasted pork.

Follow them on Instagram @bresswinecider on Facebook @bresswinecider or call 03 5474 2262.

Fig Cafe

Each day the enticing display cabinet at Fig is filled with mouth watering, freshly baked cakes and pastries, platters laden with salads of seasonal vegetables and grains, and savoury delights.

Fresh is everything and the influences are broad, reflective of modern eating. Julia Bandelli, who co-owns the business with her mother Victoria Falconer, says as the season changes their menu moves away from roasted dishes to lighter foods like salads and raw foods.

The edame tartine, a charred sourdough base topped with vibrant green Japanese peas and drizzled with fresh olive oil screams Spring and raw or lightly pickled vegetable like zucchini and cauliflower deliver great flavour and texture.

“With the start of Spring comes the promise of delicious things like tomatoes, basil and stone fruit,” says Julia. “That’s the great thing about seasonal eating.”

Follow them on Instagram @figcastlemaine on Facebook @figcastlemaine or call 03 5472 5311.

 

Togs Place & Mulberrys Delicatessen

Known for great coffee and homemade food Togs Place is a family-friendly café with a roof top deck that’s one of the best spots in town on a sunny Spring morning.

The menu changes daily and in Spring it’s out with casseroles and in with dishes like pasta prima vera, light Spring minestrone soup and zingy Vietnamese chicken salad.

Next door is Mulberrys Delicatessen, stocking Australian and European cheeses, meats, house made products like chutneys and biscuits and eclectic gifts.

Manager Cas Davey’s pick for Spring is local soft goat cheese from small producers like Holy Goat in Sutton Grange.

“The goats have just kidded so the milk is abundant, sweet and light and this makes for a really delicious cheese,” she says. “Try pairing it with our smoked Harris Gravlax and New Zealand Oat Crackers for your next Spring party.”

Follow them on Instagram @mulberrysdeli on Facebook @togsplacecafe call Togs Place on 5470 5490 or Mulberrys on 5472 1652.

Cadillac Shack

Spring has brought a new American-inspired family-friendly eatery to Castlemaine. Cadillac Shack is the vision of Castlemaine locals, Graeme and Gilda Ayerst, who have transformed the Mostyn Street premises into a 100-seat diner.

Featuring burgers, ribs, fries, salads, sundaes, shakes and a range of freak-shakes (extreme milk shakes) as well as a more extensive international menu. The range of burgers on the menu was voted the best in Melbourne by The Age Good Food Guide 2014/15.

“One of our business partners runs a very successful restaurant in outer Melbourne and their award-winning burger range has been included on our menu,” says Graeme.

We can’t wait to try.

Follow them on Instagram @cadillac_shack on Facebook @cadillacshack or call 03 5416 1486.

 

Castlemaine Secondary College: a true community school

Whole school assembly in the new gymnasium

It has been a big year for Castlemaine Secondary College. After years of development and planning they’re decommissioning their old senior campus and bringing everyone together at a new, purpose-built 7 – 12 site. They’ve also appointed a new Principal, Castlemaine Secondary graduate, Paul Frye.

“I’m extremely proud to have returned to Castlemaine Secondary and be leading it through such exciting, pivotal times,” says Paul.

Paul grew up in Castlemaine, leaving to study then teach in schools around the state before returning in 2010 as one of the school’s assistant principals. He took a detour in early 2017, taking up an acting principal position at one of the local primary schools, and was appointed Principal in July 2017.

“We have some amazing new facilities and are about to open more,” says Paul.

The first new building to open back in 2014 was the Wellbeing Centre and Gym, which includes science labs and classrooms. The Engineering and Trade facilities followed at the start of 2017 and the new performing arts centre, including auditorium, drama and music rooms, will be completed by the end of the year.

Eventually there will be four precincts: Wellbeing, Engineering, Performing Arts and Art/Administration, all built around a central piazza.

CSC Principal Paul Frye

“We’re a school that caters for a diverse range of students and we’ve been working on building a 7 – 12 culture for a few years now,” says Paul.

“It’s great to finally all be together. Watching the younger kids walk through the learning spaces and see the Year 12s with their heads down, working away, really adds to the culture. Prior to that VCE was a bit of a mystery to them.”

The school offers a broad range of programs, including a Steiner stream, but is still small enough that students are known by their teachers, the majority of whom live locally.

“I’m proud of the fact that we are a true community school,” says Paul. “We are the only 7 – 12 provider in town and that carries with it a lot of responsibility.”

“We have a strong diversity of students and we cater for everyone, from the high achieving students to those who struggle and we have a range of programs to keep them all engaged and supported.”

“I think we do a really good job of enabling students to get to the destination they choose,” he adds.

“Some aspire to university and we have an excellent record of getting them there with consistently high VCE results. Others want to go out into the workforce or into TAFE and we have programs to help them achieve their goals.”

Like to know more? Visit www.csc.vic.edu.au call 03 5479 1111 or email castlemaine.sc@edumail.vic.gov.au

Follow them on Instagram @castlemaine.sc

Remoteness no obstacle

The vendor at 171 Wilsons Lane in Clydesdale expected it would take some time to sell her 37 acre property in a secluded valley between Daylesford and Castlemaine. She knew the remoteness of the location would not be for everyone.

She had owned the property since 2009 and over the intervening years created stunning landscaped gardens to complement the contemporary home, but in 2016 a life in town, with all its conveniences, began to appeal. Dissatisfied with the local agents in Daylesford she was referred to Waller Realty and met Tom Robertson.

Tom was extremely positive and enthusiastic about the property. With little if anything to be done to get it ready for market her home was listed within weeks and to her surprise, sold in just five days.

Tom’s knowledge of potential buyers already in the market was a great asset according to the vendor. He understood very quickly who might be the right fit and contacted them directly. The marketing of the property and the open for inspection attracted even more interested parties.

Tom kept her informed every step of the way and she describes working with him as one of the best experiences she’s had buying or selling real estate.

“I’ve dealt with a few agents in the past and I would have to say working with Tom was one of the best experiences I’ve had.”

If you would like to speak with Tom about your property contact our Castlemaine office on 03 5470 5811, call Tom on 0408 596 871, or email him at tom@wallerrealty.com.au

Tom Robertson

 

Local Landcarers take out statewide awards

Cactus warrior information stall at the Maldon-Baringhup Agricultural Show

Landcare groups from around the state met at Government House last week for the 2017 Victorian Landcare Awards with many of the top prizes awarded to groups and individuals from the shire.

“We were thrilled with the results,” says Regional Landcare Coordinator, Tess Grieves. “The Mount Alexander Shire was so well represented and really successful at the awards.”

The awards are held every two years and celebrate the efforts of hundreds of individuals, community groups, schools and organisations across Victoria that protect and enhance the natural environment and improve sustainable agriculture.

This year, 85 nominations were received in the 14 award categories, winners in several categories will go on to represent the state at the 2018 National Landcare Awards.

Connecting Country, a community-operated landscape restoration organisation, which also operates as an informal Landcare network across the Mount Alexander Shire, was awarded the Landcare Network Award.

Ian Higgins from Friends of Campbells Creek won the Australian Government Individual Landcare Award for his work transforming Campbells Creek from a degraded, weed-infested dump to a site rich with native vegetation.

Another shire resident, Ian Grenda, was Highly Commended in this category.

Local cactus warriors, The Tarrangower Cactus Control Group (TCCG) received the Fairfax Media Landcare Community Groups Award for their work over the last decade destroying millions of wheel cactus plants and restoring their local environment.

The TCCG was praised for its community-based approach, linking people together and raising awareness throughout the shire, particularly through their monthly field days.

“Winning the award is recognition of the effort we’ve all put in,” says Ian Grenda, who has been with TCCG from the very beginning.

“Groups and individuals from the Shire did well in many categories. I think it’s a great indication of just how active Landcare is in the region. We’re all trying to do something positive for our local environment.”

Also nominated this year were Asha Bannon from Connecting Country for the Young Landcarer Award and Chewton and Winters Flat Primary Schools for the Junior Landcare Teams Award.

Congratulations to all the winners and the nominees.

 

 

Innovative small farming model developed in Harcourt

Bendigo West MP Maree Edwards meets with members of the Harcourt Organic Farming Alliance at the Finlay family farm in Harcourt.

Small-scale organic farming in the region received a boost last month with news that the Victorian Government would back development of a unique, collaborative farming model.

Hugh and Katie Finlay of Mount Alexander Fruit Gardens have a plan. They want to establish an alliance of small organic farmers on their Harcourt property, all running different, but complementary, enterprises.

Katie describes it as the “perfect collision of a range of problems”.

“Small-scale organic farming is risky,” she says. “With all the risk and the expenses usually carried by a single family.”

“We’ve often wondered whether there’s a better way we could farm that would share the risks, but also make better use of the resources. There are lots of dedicated, passionate people out there who want to run their own farming business, but the barriers, especially buying land, are prohibitive.”

The Finlays also have a succession issue to solve. They want to keep their orchard in production but take a much less active role. Their children don’t want to come home and run the farm but they don’t want to sell.

The Harcourt Organic Farming Alliance would give small organic farmers the opportunity to lease acreage on the Finlay’s Harcourt property. The Finlays hope that will include someone to lease their orchard so they can step back, oversee the alliance and give more of their energy to their online teaching business, Grow Great Fruit.

Hugh and Katie already have a successful lease arrangement in place with a market garden (where the idea of the Harcourt Organic Farming Alliance first began), and have now been joined by a micro-dairy and vermouth producer as they begin work on a Business Development Plan with backing from a $10,000 Regional Development Victoria grant.

They’ll use the funding and this development phase to lay the groundwork and establish the structure of the alliance. Investigating co-marketing opportunities, new products and how they can share resources to keep the cost of farming as low as possible.

“While there are lots of people share farming we don’t know of any arrangements with that extra layer of partnership agreement over the top,” says Katie.

“I’m a big believer in people owning their own business. I think you get much better buy in and people take it more seriously.”

Depending on the outcome of the development phase they hope to opt in to more funding for implementation and gain more partners.

“The environment is really changing,” says Katie. “The shift to alliances, collaborations and cooperatives is happening everywhere and both the State and Federal Governments have an appetite for funding these projects,” she says.

The business development plan will be completed by the end of the year and we look forward to seeing where it takes them.

 

Great values matched by experience

The vendors at Baringhup West Road and Rumbolds Road in Baringhup West bought their first property from Brett Tweed in 2007. When it came time to sell their nearly 200ha farm, Brett was the agent they called.

Finding the right buyer for a large holding takes time and patience. These vendors say Brett never wavered and they never doubted their property was in good hands.

They describe Brett as a person with good values and integrity, a true professional with strong business ethics. His background in agricultural studies was a tremendous asset when dealing with prospective buyers, especially those new to farming and rural life, and his sense of humour and even temper made him a great person to deal with.

Brett kept the vendors informed throughout the sales process, developing a great working relationship and securing them a sale.

If you would like to speak with Brett about your property contact our Castlemaine office on 03 5470 5811, call Brett on 0417 564 697, or email him at brett@wallerrealty.com.au

Retro revival

Injecting older homes with a whole lot of style Part 3

Updating a home from the 70s, 80s or 90s might not sound as romantic as stripping back a little post-war weatherboard charmer, but there are lots of advantages, not the least of which is cost.

These homes offer excellent value for money. They’re less likely to need the big jobs like re-wiring or re-stumping and with their more modern open floor plans, simple, cosmetic upgrades can achieve big results.

For this story we’re lucky enough to be able to show you more of the transformation of a 1970s Castlemaine home purchased from Waller Realty in 2015. The house was in pretty bad shape when the owners bought it but as you can see, what they’ve been able to achieve is pretty spectacular.

Ask the experts

In the first two parts of this story we looked at using landscaping to modernise and soften exteriors, opening up the floor plan and using simple materials like paint to bring in more light and things to consider when it comes to the electrics. This time, Lynne Mewett, Interior Designer and Principal at Creative Ambience shares her ideas.

“Homes from these eras don’t generally have any task lighting,” says Lynne. “This is a real focus in modern homes so it’s a great place to start, especially in the kitchen.”

Ambient or general lighting provides overall illumination while task lighting, as the name suggests, helps you perform specific tasks like cooking and food preparation, reading, working, etc.

“Adding recessed, pendant or under cabinet lighting over work surfaces can provide an instant lift,” says Lynne

Task lighting has been used to great effect in the Castlemaine home. Work surfaces are suddenly brighter and more inviting to use, even with the addition of extra overhead cupboards.

Speaking of cupboards, Lynne suggests keeping a kitchen intact, if the carcass is good, and updating by painting or replacing door and drawer fronts, changing splashbacks from tile to glass and adding new bench tops.

“Updating a dark, laminate bench top to a light stone will not only provide a beautiful work surface it will also bring in more light, especially if you add glass splash back and task lighting,” she says.

The owners at Castlemaine have gone for a combination of approaches, replacing door fronts, adding some new cabinetry, changing tiles and giving everything a fresh coat of paint. What a difference!

Changing window furnishings is another trick Lynne relies on to make a big difference without a big price tag.

“The tendency in these eras was to have drapes, which, while fabulous insulators, add volume and can make a room appear smaller,” she says. “These days most people prefer blinds or shutters.”

What’s needed depends on the room. You want as much light as possible in living areas, while for bedrooms and bathrooms privacy is the top priority. Thankfully, there are blinds to suit pretty much any specification.

Holland or Roller blinds are both space and cost effective. The images below show the difference replacing drapes with these blinds can make.

“The great thing about these houses is that most of them have good bones,” says Lynne. “They’re open plan, they have things like alfresco areas and ensuites and these are exactly what people want in a modern home today.”

We agree Lynne! So, don’t be daunted by first appearances. See beyond the dated fittings and daggy finishes and visualise these homes as they could be. With a little ingenuity and some hard work you might just uncover the home of your dreams.

Take a look at our current listings and see if you can find one for yourself.

Follow up with Part 1 and Part 2 of this story here.

Personable and proactive

The vendors at 18 Yurunga Drive in Castlemaine wanted to downsize, reduce their energy consumption and spend less time on maintenance. They had already purchased a block of land and were keen to start building when they met with Nick Haslam.

Experienced with buying and selling in Castlemaine they chose Waller Realty as they felt the team was the most proactive in town. They also recognised how well the agents worked together with a focus on achieving the best results.

From the very first meeting they were pleased with Nick’s approach, describing him as personable and very easy to talk to.

They were initially surprised by the price Nick set for the property but say he was confident it could be achieved and they trusted his instincts. They did not have to wait long. The property sold within five weeks and for only just under the asking price.

If you would like to speak with Nick about your property contact our Castlemaine office on 03 5470 5811, call Nick on 0418 322 789, or email him at nick@wallerrealty.com.au

Nick Haslam

Highly skilled and professional

When the vendor at 5 Camp Street Daylesford made the decision to sell he knew he needed to find an experienced agent.

Having lovingly restored Goodman House, one of the finest properties in the district, over the past 18 years he wanted someone who could appreciate how unique the property was and who was skilled enough to handle a sale of this size and nature.

Tom Robertson came highly recommended and made the trip to Daylesford to see the property the day the vendor called. He describes Tom as highly skilled and professional, respectful of his wishes when it came to the specifics of the sale process, and absolutely discrete.

Tom recommended some minor works be taken care of before listing the property and was able to work around the vendor’s requirements in terms of price and marketing. Within a month the property was on the market and within just three weeks, it had sold.

The vendor says he was thrilled not only with the swift sale but also with the buyers, who he says understood and appreciated the property.

If you would like to speak with Tom about your property contact our Castlemaine office on 03 5470 5811, call Tom on 0408 596 871, or email him at tom@wallerrealty.com.au

 

Tom Robertson

Maldon Primary: balancing academics and wellbeing

Maldon Primary grade prep/one students working on some fun maths games in class. Image supplied by Maldon Primary School.

Deciding where to send your kids to school can be agonising, especially if you’re moving to a new town. In the Mount Alexander Shire we offer everything from state to Steiner education and from tiny one class schools to large contemporary colleges.

We thought we’d drop in and ask the schools to share what makes them unique. First up, Maldon Primary.

“Maldon Primary is a warm and friendly place to send your child,” says Principal, Jodie Mengler.

Jodie has been at Maldon for 19 years, five as principal, and says the school, which currently has enrolments of 94 students, is strong in both academics and student wellbeing.

In 2016 Maldon was named in the top five most improved primary schools in Australia based on data shared on the Federal Government’s, My Schools website.

“We’ve been on a huge improvement journey over the last three years implementing programs to ensure every child is able to reach their full potential and thrive,” she says.

The Kids as Catalyst Program, an innovative, child-led social change program for grades 4 – 6 children, is one she’s particularly proud of.

“The kids work like mini philanthropists, developing partnerships with community groups, working out what they need and implementing a project,” she says.

“Children often find it hard to step into the shoes of others,” Jodie adds. “With Catalyst they identify and solve real problems and learn how rewarding giving back can be.”

The school has recently worked with the Maldon Men’s Shed, Maldon Pre-School and the local Community Emergency Response Team (CERT). A group this year is working with Maldon Hospital to introduce animals for therapy.

Maldon Primary School main building

When you visit the school you can’t help but be wowed by the grounds. Whether it’s AFL, soccer, playing in sand, in the music garden, feeding the chooks or the fish, working in the vegie garden (where the children regularly harvest and cook meals to share), using the fitness equipment or just dragging branches to build cubbies, the opportunities for play are vast.

The school buildings reflect the heritage and history of the town (Australia’s first Notable Town) but look inside and you’ll discover thoroughly contemporary learning spaces thanks to over half a million dollars of building upgrades which have just been completed.

“It’s all about creating an environment where the children love coming to school and where parents know their children will be happy and safe,” says Jodie.

“The partnerships we have with parents and the wider community are so important to us. We want families to be part of the school community and know that we value their input into their child’s education.”

Like to know more? Visit Maldon Primary School, call 03 5475 1484 or email maldon.ps@edumail.vic.gov.au